Central Point School District #6

Learn more about our CAMP program

January 23rd, 2018 by kimbra.lecornu@district6.org

CAMP information night for new families interested in our magnet program.

January 29th at 7pm in the Hanby Library.

http://blogs.district6.org/camp/

Central Point School District 6 Compliance with Division 22 Standards

January 18th, 2018 by amy.shipley@district6.org

As reported to the School Board on January 9, 2018, Central Point School District 6 is in compliance with all state standards set forth in OAR chapter 581, division 22.

Division 22_Report to Community

MLK Event Statement

January 12th, 2018 by amy.shipley@district6.org

January 12, 2018

District 6 Community:

The Central Point Community MLK celebration last evening included student-­produced material that many members of the audience – especially younger students – found upsetting or offensive. I sincerely regret aspects of the program that could be perceived as inappropriately political, disturbing, or unsuitable for younger students.

District 6 encourages and supports student voice — especially the voices of those who have been marginalized, discriminated against or abused. We also recognize that students may need guidance about where and how that message is communicated to be most effective, and last evening was a missed opportunity to do so. An event that was billed as a “community celebration of MLK” was not the place for explicit and disturbing material. Further, I’m concerned that the tone and some of the material could be construed as more divisive than uniting — the opposite of Dr. King’s message.

In the future, every effort will be made to assure that material presented at community or school events be reviewed by an administrator prior to public performance.  Further, school staff will provide specific information about content in performances that may be unsuitable for younger students and communicate that information to parents and audience members prior to the performance.  Finally, our concerns about the event and meeting these expectations have been communicated with staff involved.

I very much appreciate the feedback we received from parents and community about this event. District 6 remains committed to providing an educational experience that is safe, thoughtful and supportive of ALL students.

Sincerely,

Samantha Steele

Superintendent

Budget Committee Vacancy

January 11th, 2018 by amy.shipley@district6.org

School District #6 is presently in the process of accepting applications for the District #6 Budget Committee. We have one position open at this time.

This committee convenes primarily in May to analyze budget requests and make appropriate recommendations.  An applicant must be a registered voter and have lived in School District #6 for a minimum of one year.

Budget Committee members are selected by the Board of Directors from a pool of available applicants.  Term of office is three years.

Applications are available at the Central Point Administration Office (300 Ash Street) or by clicking on the link below.  Completed applications should be returned to Amy Shipley, District Administration Office. This position will remain open until filled.

BudgetCmte_App

2016-2017 Report Cards

November 6th, 2017 by amy.shipley@district6.org

Oregon School and District Report Cards

Annually, the state of Oregon assesses school and district performance based upon metrics including student attendance, graduation, and standardized test performance. While standardized testing is not our purpose in District 6, we do pay attention to that data as one indicator of our performance. Other data such as graduation rates and attendance rates are reviewed at the school and district level to identify areas of success and areas of challenge. This year, our district out-performed the state in some key areas – drop-out rates are significantly lower than state and region averages; graduation rates are higher than state and region averages, and our High School English Language Arts, Middle School Math, and both High School and Middle School Science exceeded the state averages. Please see links to the report cards here:

1617_ReportCard_District_English

1617_ReportCard_District_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_CPE_English

1617_ReportCard_CPE_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_Jewett_English

1617_ReportCard_Jewett_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_MRE_English

1617_ReportCard_MRE_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_Patrick_English

1617_ReportCard_Patrick_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_SVE_English

1617_ReportCard_SVE_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_Hanby_English

1617_ReportCard_Hanby_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_Scenic_English

1617_ReportCard_Scenic_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_CAHPS_English

1617_ReportCard_CAHPS_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_BIS_English

1617_ReportCard_BIS_Spanish

1617_ReportCard_CRA_English

1617_ReportCard_CRA_Spanish

 

Updates to test results for lead levels in D6 schools

October 20th, 2017 by matt.price@district6.org

October 20, 2017

Results of our follow up tests for faucets which exceeded EPA limits during our previous rounds of testing in December and April are listed below. These tests, along with future tests, are part of the District’s protocol to locate the sources of lead. Remedies to correct lead levels which exceed EPA limits may include replacement of fixtures, the addition of filters, and/or other plumbing projects.  Alternative sources of water may be supplied if plumbing work cannot be completed in time for school.  This process represents our commitment to provide our students and staff with water which meet standards set by the EPA.

Test Results Scenic Middle School

Test Results Central Point Elementary School

Test Results Jewett Elementary School

Air Quality Update–September 8, 2017

September 8th, 2017 by Samantha Steele

A shift in weather has allowed for some improvement in air quality; it’s a welcome change.  Principals and school staff will use the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s Air Quality Index, aligned to the EPA’s Guide for Schools, to make decisions about student activity.  This means that outdoor activities may be possible today.  If you would like your student to remain indoors, please send a note or contact your child’s school–an indoor option is always available.  Should your child choose to remain indoors for any reason, he or she will be allowed to stay in.  If you have questions or concerns, please contact your building principal or you’re always welcome to contact me–Samantha Steele samantha.steele@district6.org, 541-494-6201 (office) 541-840-5644 (cell).

Air Quality Update and FAQ–September 6, 2017

September 6th, 2017 by Samantha Steele

While many parents are relieved that schools are up and running throughout the valley, we’ve had our share of concerns—many of those posted on the district and school FaceBook pages.  The following is a “Frequently Asked Questions” that may give some insight into our logic about keeping our schools open.

 The Air Quality Index is consistently poor—from “unhealthy” to “very unhealthy” and “hazardous”—why would schools remain open?

While the air quality is indeed terrible, we want to be sure that parents and families have a choice about sending kids to schools.  Some families, especially those with children who have medical issues or are sensitive to smoke, may choose to keep their children home.  Others simply feel more comfortable keeping their kids at home during this time.  And, some families view the smoky air as inescapable and find that our schools are no worse than the air quality in their homes and communities.  Closing schools for all students removes the choice for families and requires every student to stay home.  We respect and support the decisions of parents who choose to send their kids to school as well as parents who choose to keep their kids at home.

How are you monitoring air quality?

We’ve consistently used the DEQ’s website, www.deq.state.or.us and the data from the Medford Grant/Belmont station (this is the station closest to our district).    As the air quality shifts (we hope) over the next few weeks, we’ll use the Air Quality Index, along with the EPA Guidelines for Schools, the Oregon Health Department Guidelines for Student Activity and the OSSA Guidelines to make decisions about outdoor student activity.  If you’ve been on-line, you know that the DEQ site has experienced some difficulties because of high traffic—we continue to “refresh” the page and have been able (so far) to get data virtually every hour.  Also, we can use the 5-3-1 Visibility Index and would use the more conservative of the two.

What about my student missing class, assignments and instruction?

Schools and staff will do everything possible to provide assignments and support for students who do not attend.  Should you choose to keep your child at home, contact your school to discuss options that would best support you and your child.  Getting assignments and homework is one option.  For those who would like to reduce the number of hours their child is in school, talk with your principal about a partial day schedule.  These are extraordinary circumstances—our school staff recognizes that and we have nothing but respect for our parents’ choices for their own children.

What about classrooms and schools without air conditioning?

There is no doubt that air-conditioning assists with making classrooms more comfortable and it does assist with some air filtering.  However, in schools and classrooms, students entering and exiting (opening doors throughout the day) mitigates much of air filtering benefit of the air conditioning.  Additionally, many of our buildings are designed so that each classroom opens to the outside (no interior hall ways), so students are outside between classes, going to the cafeteria or library, etc.  Classrooms without air conditioning have had to manage both heat and air quality—definitely a difficult situation and one that we’re monitoring.

Why have there been windows and doors open at my child’s school?

Ideally, the weather outside would be mild and keeping doors and windows closed as much as possible would be the rule of thumb.  However, teachers and other staff will make decisions as conditions evolve—they are likely trying to strike a balance between heat and smoky air.  Our maintenance department is working closely with principals to identify the best strategies for individual buildings and classrooms.  Truly, teachers and staff are making every effort to provide the safest and most comfortable learning environment given the circumstances.

Why are some students outside during the school day?

School staff rely on the DEQ hourly index to make decisions about student activity, aligned with the Oregon Health Department Guidelines and the EPA Guidelines for Schools.  Please know that parents may request that their child not be outside—contact your school.  And, any student may request an “indoor” option, even when the air quality allows for light outdoor activity.

What about adding window or portable air-conditioners to classrooms that don’t have central air?

A few folks have stepped forward and offered to donate portable air conditioners (many thanks!).  District staff will respond to these requests and suggestions by evaluating the space intended for the portable A/C and determine whether or not adding that appliance will exceed the electoral load for the circuit.   Unfortunately, in our older buildings (the one’s without A/C) the electrical system may not be equipped to handle multiple A/C units, technology, and all of the other things we plug in that didn’t exist when the building was built.   We’ll work with our Maintenance Department to further problem solve this issue on a case by case basis.

What can I do if I still have questions or concerns?

For questions specific to your child and school, the building principal is the best option.  If you have questions about our district procedures during this time, or have some great ideas for helping us navigate this, please contact me samantha.steele@district6.org, 541-494-6201 (office), 541-840-5644 (cell).  We certainly don’t have all of the answers, but I know the D6 community—parents, kids, and staff—can work together during this difficult time to keep our kids safe and healthy.

 

Air quality and outdoor student activity, school closure or delay

September 3rd, 2017 by admin

Currently, schools in District 6 will open on Tuesday, as scheduled. School closures or delays resulting from air quality issues will be handled like severe weather delays and closures. School officials will monitor the Air Quality Index and weather to consider school closure or delay should conditions be deemed unsafe. Any decisions about closure or delay will be made by 6:00 am on school days (at the very latest) and posted on the District 6 website and Facebook page. Staff will be notified via email.

The Department of Environmental Quality has consistently categorized the air quality in the Rogue Valley as “unhealthy” (although there have been a few, brief windows of relief) and today the Air Quality Index has reached “Very Unhealthy” levels for much of the valley. The proximity, intensity and size of surrounding wildfires, combined with our typical summer weather conditions, suggest that the valley will face smoky conditions for at least a few weeks.

All children are designated “sensitive populations” and during “Unhealthy” and worse conditions, should limit activity in smoky conditions. School officials are closely monitoring the air quality conditions and use the DEQ’s index to make decisions about outdoor activity, along with specific guidance from the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) for secondary athletics and activities, and the Oregon Health Department for outdoor school activities (recess, PE and other activities).

Use the following links for specific information: http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/, Oregon Health Department Guidelines, OSAA Guidance, EPA Guidelines for Schools.

While it’s easy to limit outdoor activities, conditions indoors also pose some risk to children and adults. The majority of our buildings are quite old and not equipped with air conditioning. However, even air-conditioned spaces provide little protection from the outdoor air quality. Air handlers utilize outside air for cooling and the filtration system in typical air conditioning systems does not filter out all hazardous particles. Only chambered entrances combined with air purification systems (found in buildings like hospitals and some homes) offer significant insulation from poor outdoor air quality. Further, simply opening and closing exterior doors (something that happens consistently through the school day) exposes interior, air-conditioned spaces directly to outdoor air conditions.

Any student who is sensitive to outdoor air conditions will be allowed to remain indoors for recess, PE or other activities. School staff, including principals, teachers, and classified staff are aware that some students may be extra sensitive to the smoke.

Finally, parents will ultimately make decisions about their child’s exposure to smoky outdoor air. If your child is particularly sensitive to the smoky air or has a medical condition that requires limited exposure, you may choose not to send your child to school. If this is the case, please contact your school; arrangements can be made for your child to receive assignments at home.

Even as the smoky air poses a challenge for opening week, District 6 schools and staff are prepared and excited to welcome your children to the 2017-18 school year.

June 12th, 2017 by admin